Offensive Rules

by Coach Ronn Wyckoff,Author/Producer

Basketball On A Triangle

Every basketball player needs and deserves a teaching-coach in the early years. Each skill needs to be broken down into building blocks, where the level of difficulty can be raised as the individual grasps and possesses the skill before moving on.

Getting it right from the start requires that a player be taught fundamental basketball skills correctly in the first years of playing. A lot of habits have already been set by the time a player is a teenager. If they are incorrect, they can be very difficult to change.

To become the complete teaching-basketball coach, or a complete player, no aspect of development can be ignored, lest one's development be 'incomplete'. Defense is half the game. If it's not being taught well, or played well, half the game is missing. If offensive skills and rebounding aren't being taught and played correctly, how can a player expect to play at his/her highest potential? Teaching-coaches have to be able to recognize even the

smallest skill weakness and be able to break down that skill for the player to better understand and execute. Everything about successful teaching is about paying attention to the details! It's the little things which are a part of discipline for both the teacher and player.

Basketball On A Triangle

If you’ve been teaching basketball fundamentals correctly on the individual level, and you are ready to move up to the level of putting the team together, below are some offensive rules which may help you to be a more effective teaching-coach.

OFFENSIVE RULES:

1. IT IS IMPORTANT TO MAINTAIN GOOD BALANCE AND TO KEEP YOUR BODY UNDER CONTROL AT ALL TIMES.

2. GOOD OFFENSIVE FLOOR BALANCE RESEMBLES A TRIANGLE.

3. GETTING OPEN OR FREE TO RECEIVE A PASS RESULTS FROM DOING OUR "HOMEWORK".

4. WHEN ATTEMPTING TO RECEIVE A PASS, WE SHOULD KEEP OUR EYES ON THE BALL AND GIVE THE PASSER A LEAD HAND OR TARGET TO PASS TO.

5. A PASS SHOULD BE THROWN TO THE RECEIVER'S HANDS OR TO HlS/HER NUMBERS.

6. AFTER RECEIVING A PASS AT THE WING, A PLAYER SHOULD THEN TURN AND FACE THE BASKET, READY TO PASS, SHOOT OR DRIVE TO THE HOOP.

7. AFTER RECEIVING A PASS AT THE POST POSITION, IF DEFENSIVE PRESSURE COMES FROM THE RIGHT OR LEFT, IMMEDIATELY DROP STEP AWAY FROM PRESSURE AND DRIVE TO THE HOOP. GETTING NO PRESSURE, THE POST PLAYER SHOULD TURN AND FACE THE BASKET, READY TO PASS, SHOOT OR DRIVE TO THE HOOP. TO HARD PRESSURE FROM BEHIND, DON'T TRY TO GO ONE-ON-ONE. KICK THE BALL BACK OUT TO THE PERIMITER.

8. THERE ARE CERTAIN AREAS ON THE FLOOR WHERE SHOTS ARE MOST OFTEN TAKEN. THESE ARE THE SHOOTING SPOTS WE PRACTICE FROM.

9. IF YOU ARE STANDING STILL ON OFFENSE, THE DEFENSE IS ALSO STANDING STILL. KEEP THE DEFENDER OCCUPIED. KEEP IN MOVEMENT WITH A PURPOSE.

10. THE THREE BASIC MOVES FOR A PERIMETER PLAYER AFTER MAKING A PASS ARE: FAKE AND CUT TO THE HOOP, SCREEN AWAY, OR FILL A VACANT POSITION ON THE TRIANGLE—USUALLY THE POINT.

11. 9 AND 10 ABOVE, WHEN DONE BY ALL PLAYERS WITHOUT THE BALL, WILL RESULT IN CONTINUOUS MOVEMENT.

12. WHEN SHOOTING FROM THE 1 AND 2 SPOTS (under, and to either side of the basket)ALWAYS USE A BANK SHOT.

13. THE DROP-STEP AND DRIVE MOVE IN THE POST IS CALLED THE POWER MOVE. THE SHOT WE PRACTICE FROM THE #1 SPOT IS THE POWER SHOT.

Yours in Sport & Spirit,
Coach Ronn

www.Top-Basketball-Coaching.com

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